Category: IP: Trade Marks, Copyright & Designs

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Fashion Law Update – November 2021 edition
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Optimising your D2C e-commerce fashion operation – top 10 tips
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Mike Tyson Sues Australian Streetwear Brand Culture Kings
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“All Aboard” As Guerlain Departs From the Norm: The General Court of the EU Finds Distinctive Character in Boat Hull Shaped Lipstick Packaging
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UNICOLORS v. H&M: COPYRIGHT REGISTRATION VALIDITY
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Fashion Law Update
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Riding On Coat-tails, Doesn’t Come Free: UK High Court Awards Additional Damages for Oh Polly’s Flagrant Infringement of House of CB’s Unregistered Design Rights
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When Is an Office Chair Design Famous? U.S. Supreme Court Won’t Hear Herman Miller’s Trade Dress Appeal Regarding the Eames Chair
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GLITTERS DID NOT MAKE SUCH A SPARKLE DIFFERENCE…NOT ON THIS OCCASION!
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Australian Movement Trade Marks: Businesses “Moving” with the Times?

Fashion Law Update – November 2021 edition

Fashion is the armor to survive the reality of everyday life

Bill Cunningham

In this edition of Fashion Law, we look at the emerging and evolving trends within the retail, luxury goods and fashion sectors post COVID-19 around the world.

In this edition, we focus on a few themes which include:

  • Navigating a fashion brand’s transition to direct to consumer
  • Important updates for brands selling goods in Europe
  • Managing supply chain risk – the U.S. perspective
  • Consumer Law in Australia
  • What’s happening in fashion intellectual property?
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Optimising your D2C e-commerce fashion operation – top 10 tips

The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated most brands’ plans to grow their own direct to consumer (D2C) e-commerce presence. For many brands, this has become essential to their continued survival and competitiveness.
However, how does a fashion brand run a successful e-commerce site whilst retaining the exclusive allure and personal feel of its designer stores? What are the key legal pitfalls it should be looking out for as it navigates this changing landscape? We’ve pulled together 10 lessons learnt over the past 18 months:

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Mike Tyson Sues Australian Streetwear Brand Culture Kings

Mike Tyson, the famous former boxer, has sued Australian streetwear brand Culture Kings and its founders. Mr Tyson alleges the respondents have engaged in misleading and deceptive conduct under the Australian Consumer Law for using his name, nicknames and likeness to sell t-shirts, without his permission. Mr Tyson alleges that Culture Kings’ t-shirts bear images of him, his name as well as his monikers “Iron Mike”, and “Kid Dynamite”.

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“All Aboard” As Guerlain Departs From the Norm: The General Court of the EU Finds Distinctive Character in Boat Hull Shaped Lipstick Packaging

In what will be welcomed by innovative design brands, on 14 July 2021, the General Court of the EU handed down a decision annulling the EUIPO and Board of Appeal’s decisions that a mark filed by Guerlain lacked distinctive character. This decision emphasises that a distinctiveness assessment of a three-dimensional mark must be undertaken by reference to the specifics of common practice in the market for the relevant products.

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UNICOLORS v. H&M: COPYRIGHT REGISTRATION VALIDITY

By Susan Kayser and Betsy Byra

On June 1, 2021, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in the ongoing case of Unicolors v. H&M Hennes & Mauritz, L.P., No. 20-915.  With a nearly $1 million copyright verdict on the line, pattern manufacturer Unicolors, Inc.’s (“Unicolors”) fate is now at the Supreme Court to decide whether courts should refer copyright registration validity challenges to the Copyright Office where there is a known misrepresentation in the registration, but no evidence of intent to defraud.

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Fashion Law Update

“Style is the only thing you can’t buy. It’s not in a shopping bag, a label, or a price tag. It’s something reflected from our soul to the outside world—an emotion.”

Alber Elbaz

In this edition of Fashion Law, we have a huge selection of articles from around the world.

As many countries ease into a new way of living with/post COVID-19, the way we do business has changed. Some businesses managed to expand their offerings going online, while others needed to increase their brand protection to counteract copycats, trade mark and design infringements.

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Riding On Coat-tails, Doesn’t Come Free: UK High Court Awards Additional Damages for Oh Polly’s Flagrant Infringement of House of CB’s Unregistered Design Rights

On 24 February 2021, the UK High Court found that a number of Oh Polly dress designs had infringed the unregistered design rights of its competitor, House of CB. This recent decision confirms the risk of additional damages being awarded if infringers flagrantly copy third party designs, whilst also confirming the difficulties brand owners face in bringing passing off actions based solely on copycat designs.

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When Is an Office Chair Design Famous? U.S. Supreme Court Won’t Hear Herman Miller’s Trade Dress Appeal Regarding the Eames Chair

The U.S. Supreme Court decided not to take up Herman Miller, Inc.’s appeal from a Ninth Circuit holding that partially overturned a jury verdict and held that Herman Miller’s popular Eames office chair (average retail price US$1,200) is not “famous” enough to qualify for trade dress dilution protection.[1] The Supreme Court’s denial of Herman Miller’s petition means the Ninth Circuit’s decision will stand.

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GLITTERS DID NOT MAKE SUCH A SPARKLE DIFFERENCE…NOT ON THIS OCCASION!

The sparkle effect that characterizes, since the very beginning, the Blonde Salad shoes did not impress the judges of the Court of Milan in a case in which the Tecnica Group S.p.A. (“Tecnica”) appealed the competent authorities in order to defend their famous Moon Boot snow boots – inspired by the footwear used by astronauts in the 1969 moon landing – against the snow boots marketed with the Chiara Ferragni Collection’s trademark.

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Australian Movement Trade Marks: Businesses “Moving” with the Times?

In a technological age where most consumers are receiving their information digitally, brands need to find new ways to engage with consumers. With nine out of ten Australians owning a smart phone and spending on average three hours a day on their devices, consumer engagement by way of multimedia is growing, increasing the popularity of movement trade marks.

The first movement trade mark was registered in Australia in 2002. There are currently 99 registered movement trade marks in Australia.

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